smart is the new pretty

Tag: literature

The Girls by Emma Cline (Review)

The Girls by Emma Cline (Review)

The Girls by Emma Cline is the type of book that is so exceptional, I almost feel like I’m doing it a disservice by blogging about it. I don’t usually place too much emphasis on the literary versus the non-literary (e.g. genre works, or “just […]

The Fortune Hunter by Daisy Goodwin

The Fortune Hunter by Daisy Goodwin

Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres. By and large, I read work that can’t easily be categorized in one genre, but historical novels have a special place in my heart. Daisy Goodwin is one of the foremost historical novelists of recent years. Her […]

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris (Review)

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris (Review)

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris is one of the best books I have read in a long time (and I read a lot of books). Sedaris’s acerbic wit recounts stories of his life that are once foreign and familiar. From North Carolina to France, Sedaris explores relationships and friendships with his signature humor.

Admittedly, Sedaris’s greatest gift is his ability to make people laugh out loud while reading, but his stories probe deeper than pure comedy. Me Talk Pretty One Day is a scrambled coming-of-age story, a sort of künstlerroman about the development of a writer. Sedaris chronicles his adult struggle to learn French, anecdotes of his tanorexic sister and summers at the beach, and bizarre moments of his life as a conceptual artist.

Sedaris has a bizarre charm that pervades his work. He talks about his stint with speed as if it were mundane, satirizing the humiliation of addiction while acknowledging its tragedy. His chapters have titles like “Jesus Shaves” and “Giant Dreams, Midget Abilities,” which showcase Sedaris’s irreverent humor and creativity.

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris (Review)

I blew through Me Talk Pretty One Day, because it was pure fun to read. Sedaris’s language is luminous, his logic zany, and his prose fluid. I am convinced that he is a uniquely talented author, with a signature brand of wit. I rushed out to purchase his other books immediately after finishing Me Talk Pretty One Day, and I can’t wait to start reading them! Though I generally gravitate more towards novels than memoirs, Sedaris may convert me to a devoted nonfiction reader.

 

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My Summer Reading List

My Summer Reading List

I’m done with school (for now) which means that there’s no such thing as summer reading– in fact, I’m probably enjoying my final free summer, which means that I want to fill it with as much reading as possible. I took a trip to the […]

Currently Reading

Currently Reading

I’m not usually juggling multiple reads at once, but because of my busy school year and traveling, I currently have multiple books on my shelf, so to speak. Here are the books that I’m currently reading. Face Paint: The Story of Makeup by Lisa Eldridge: […]

My Ranking of Jane Austen’s Novels

My Ranking of Jane Austen’s Novels

Last semester, I took a single-author course for my English major on Jane Austen. I’ve read most every page Austen has written (okay, that might be an exaggeration, but I studied a whole lot of her works, even some obscure ones and partial drafts.) They’re all great, and it’s safe to say Austen was a brilliant writer (not a shocking revelation). 19th century literature isn’t for everybody, but Austen’s novels are accessible, and I think anybody might enjoy them. Jane Austen’s novels are all unique and innovative, but now that I’ve read them all, I feel comfortable enumerating my favorites. Here is my ranking of Jane Austen’s novels:

  1. Pride and Prejudice: No surprise here, but I am a fan of P&P. I first read it when I was about 14, then revisited it in the last year (which I blogged about here). Studying it in the classroom revealed the complexities of the text, which I had missed in my tender pre-teen years. However, the fairytale romance and witty humor is still there, and for somebody who is interested in reading Jane Austen for fun, Pride and Prejudice is certainly the place to start.
  2. Emma: Another famous Austen novel, Emma is playful and fun (with perhaps the most dynamic heroine of all of Austen’s works). I might be partial to Emma because of the 90s film adaptation, Clueless, but Austen’s spunky central character, mild social satire, and courtship plot are at their apex in this novel. If you’ve read Pride and Prejudice, and you want more Austen, I think Emma is the perfect follow-up.
  3. Mansfield Park: This book is such a diamond in the rough! Mansfield Park is often overlooked, but I think it is some of Austen’s best work. Perhaps the funniest of all of her novels, and the most subversive, Mansfield Park features an unconventional and shy young heroine who falls for a suitor she is forbidden from wooing. Although it might be helpful to be familiar with Austen’s style before reading this book, I find it a fresh and funny read.
  4. Persuasion: I love the title of this book, and I really wanted to like Persuasion, but I just didn’t fall for it as hard as I did the other novels. I enjoyed the themes of lost love, regret, and second chances, and I might revisit this book in a few years; perhaps if I read it out of the classroom context, I would enjoy it more. It was one of the last books we read in the semester, so maybe I was just Austened out. Nonetheless, for a J.A. newbie, Persuasion probably isn’t the place to start.
  5. Sense and Sensibility: I have come to appreciate Sense and Sensibility, becuase I’ve read it twice. When I read it for fun a couple summers ago, I hated it; Sense and Sensibility is not a particularly romantic novel. In fact, I think it’s a little sad. I like the characters, and upon studying the novel I realized that it holds an important place in the English literary canon; but in all honesty, the Austen’s other novels are more pleasurable to read.
  6. Northanger Abbey: I enjoyed reading Northanger Abbey, but it’s last on my list because it is a bit of a niche-market book. If you love Jane Austen, or you know a lot about gothic literature and the history of the novel, this book will probably appeal to you. However, because Northanger Abbey is so deeply situated in the period in which it was written, it is less accessible for a modern audience.


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The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

I mentioned how much I was loving Robert Galbraith’s mystery novels in my August favorites, but it took me all of September (and most of October) to get through The Silkworm. That’s not to say that this book isn’t engaging: in fact, it’s a page-turner. […]

How to Save Money Buying Books

How to Save Money Buying Books

Great literature is priceless, but the fact of the matter is that books cost money. Any bookworm knows that there is no feeling like the feeling of holding a brand new book in your hands. Unfortunately, that hardback habit can put some pressure on your […]

Book Review: Astonish Me by Maggie Shipstead

Book Review: Astonish Me by Maggie Shipstead

I rarely blog about books that I read for school; although there probably is a niche market for Henry James reviews, somehow I think that the public is more interested in contemporary literature. However, Astonish Me is a 2014 novel that one of my professors used in the classroom. Even though it was required reading, it felt like reading for fun.

Maggie Shipstead wrote this novel in chapter installments, which show snapshots of a family’s drama. Joan, a ballet dancer and our protagonist, falls in love with the fiery Russian ballet superstar Arslan Rusakov. Joan helps Arslan to defect from the USSR, and the two share a tumultuous and brief romantic affair as Arslan adjusts to life in New York City. An unplanned preganancy  leads Joan to marry Jacob, her high school friend who has been in love with her since his teens. Together, Joan and Jacob raise Harry, whose aptitude for ballet soon involves all who love him. This novel investigates a series of generational romances and relationships, with characters who transform and grow before the reader’s eyes. With the beautiful backdrop of Paris, New York, and Southern California, the novel is a pleasurable piece of fiction with a literary twist.

This book was a page turner, and I loved watching the characters develop over the span of the story. There were some limitations to Shipstead’s style: the story was out of order, and it only showed pieces of the character’s lives over a few decades. There were times when I was left wanting more, but that ultimately speaks to how much I enjoyed the novel.

Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll

Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll

Jessica Knoll’s 2015 novel Luckiest Girl Alive bears a quote from Megan Abbott, author of The Fever, raving “with the cunning and verve of Gillian Flynn but with an intensity all its own.” Gillian Flynn’s name is in large print, and sends an obvious message: read this […]